Archive for the 'Malaria' Category

14
Dec
11

Whats next

The AIDS/Malaria problem is far from finished and as we know it will take many years, longer than our lifetimes, to completely put an end to these problems

In the 2000 summit, the U.N defined this goal by saying that their goal was to reverse the spread of these diseases by 2015. As this goal is simply unachievable we must instead look at improving the goal at  summit that the U.N will be holding in 2015 so that it may be solved by 2030. The U.N. must now look at re-evaluating and re-assessing these goals so that they may be achievable in the future.

However this in not the end of the problem. The MDG clearly said “to combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and other diseases. Other diseases include things like Tuberculosis, Typhoid and pretty much every cancer known to man. These diseases continue to affect people everyday in both developing and developed countries. They will be problems to solve in the future and will pose challenges to be met for many years to come.

References:

www.un.org

and myself ūüôā

14
Dec
11

Malaria, a Culmination

When I began this blog i believed that MDG#6 was most important because of its global effects and the human lives that it was costing. Malaria for me at the start was the smaller of the two listed diseases and the one that i thought i would pay less attention to. In that aspect I was wrong.

Malaria, as i have come to realize is just as big of a deal as AIDS itself. Of course as with AIDS I did still have a goal in mind and once again my goal was to inform, but this time to also spread a greater awareness of what the disease really is and the true complications behind it. I believe that here to i have achieved my purpose because I once again believe that everyone who has read my posts haas learned something new about malaria and has become more aware of its implications.

The topics that i have covered with Malaria include:

– What it is

– How it is transferred

– Its global effects

– Its local effects

– Proactive people supporting the goal

– Organizations supporting the goal

– Our individual impacts

– Technology

– And the future of the disease

I believe that since the start of the blog my opinions on the matter of Malaria have in fact changed greatly as i no longer consider it as less of a deadly of threatening disease than AIDS. I still do believe, as i did from the start however that It is a major problem in our world today that needs to be solved. I believe that as a student i have learned much from this blog and that i have added greatly to my current scientific knowledge. I leave the main topic of this blog with a new view on our MDG’s and a newfound interest in this goal in particular that i believe will remain for years to come.

14
Dec
11

Malaria in the Future

Malaria is a disease that affects millions of lives every day and will continue to affect millions more if a permanent, affordable and accessible cure is brought around soon.

Malaria is disease that is totally preventable if the medication necessary was readily available to all those who are in need of it. Scientists are striving everyday to find a cure that is cheap and effective at delivering a cure for AIDS. A successful vaccine has not been found yet although some scientists believe that it is not far off. Scientists have been discovering new things about the disease every year and now that a over the counter drug line-up that can cure Malaria is well plausible and underway it is likely they will find a way to cure the disease with a single vaccine in a similar manner.

Yet despite all this progress Malaria is still a global issue and it will take the resources and input of numerous countries in order to solve. The free worldwide distribution of the already available malaria drug is the first step that is necessary to fight the Malaria virus. Many of those less fortunate than us in Canada cannot afford to buy the medicine to heal themselves and loved ones around them, the first world must understand that every country and every peoples has a right to good health and a right to survive past their childhood free of charge.

Before these key changes are made the future of Malaria will stay depressingly bleak. Without reaching these conclusions and accepting these values the world will be nowhere near ready to fulfill its 2015 dream of having reverse the spread of Malaria around the Globe.

 

 

References:

http://www.stanford.edu/class/humbio103/ParaSites2003/Malaria/FUTURE.htm

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/289/5485/1763.full

14
Dec
11

Malaria and Me

Malaria is a disease that is directly tied in with millions of people world wide and millions more indirectly. In a way it is a disease that affects the entire world, as the entire world is susceptible to it. Malaria is a disease that every person can find away to combat, even in the smallest of ways. As students in science 10 we can effectively make a difference once again through what we learned in our curriculum and what we can do as individual global citizens.

Malaria is a disease that once again mainly pertains to our biology unit. Although our level of learning and understanding of the disease may be limited, it is still enough to comprehend the diseases main characteristics and it is enough to understand how the disease behaves. From this we can inform and create awareness about the disease that we can communicate to others.

At home we can spread awareness about the disease in the same way that we can spread awareness about AIDS/HIV. We can seek to inform and educate others on the matter of Malaria and other such diseases and create a global understanding of the importance of awareness in MDG#6.

 

References:

None used.

14
Dec
11

Technology to combat Malaria

Although it is a treatable disease Malaria still claims many lives within a year, far more than what is acceptable especially when we have the means to treat it. In the world today Malaria infection rates are climbing, especially in areas such as sub-saharan Africa. Many types of technologies were developed in order treat and prevent the disease, but as with AIDS prevention starts with awareness.

As like with AIDS the first technologies that can be used to combat Malaria are those that you find right at home. By educating others about the disease, places where it resides and how to protect themselves against it society builds up a collaborative resistance just through awareness. With Malaria the largest of problems is that treatment is not affordable or available in the parts of the world that need it the most. The best we can help this is through donations, electric transfers of money that can occur right within our own homes and computers, even in the smallest amounts, can make a difference in another part of the world.

Other more advanced technologies used to combat Malaria include:

1. Malaria Vaccine – Malaria although treatable has no effective vaccination that would be practical for clinical use. It has undergone extreme study in the past years and scientists everyday are looking for new ways to create a Vaccination for the disease. Part of the reason as to why creating a vaccine is so difficult is due to the fact that the Plasmodium virus is very susceptible to evolution and adaptation. It is able to develop resistances and immunities to different types of medication. This also makes the Plasmodium virus vary from person to person, making it even harder to find a universal cure.

2. Drug treatment – Depending on the Plasmodium strand that is present in the carrier a differing series of over the counter drugs may be administered to weaken or kill the virus. This is the most effective treatment for malaria but is expensive and not easily accessibly to third world countries. Also many people have a hard time following up on the drugs as they do not know how to follow prescription and often believe that only a single dosage is enough to cure a person.

Technology does not only go as far as treatments and vaccines either, it extends to the finer hardware behind finding these viruses and producing the drugs behind them. These technologies (also applicable to AIDS) include microscopes (SEM, TEM), precision tools (cell needles), thousands of chemical agents used in both research and production process and precision lab instruments used in assembly and breakdown of products (includes things like x-ray machines, scan machines, gamma ray microwaves etc.)

Malaria is a disease that i believe is truly being combatted by technology better than most any other disease and will son show improvement as the technology used to cure becomes more and more readily available.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References:

in links

http://www.traveldoctor.info/diseases/1.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaria_vaccine (citations not included)

12
Dec
11

Dr. Alphonse Leveran Discoverer of Malaria

Dr. Alphonse Leveran was born on June 18, 1845 in Paris, In his adult life he became an Army surgeon working on the front lines of Algeria. He is regarded as the discoverer of the Malaria parasite. While working in the military the disease that is now known as malaria was a major problem in the Army. Being a surgeon Leveran often had the chance to examine patients with the disease. He came up with extremely accurate clinical details of the virus and studied its anatomic pathology. His goal was to find the causal agent of the disease.

In 1880 Leveran finally discovered the answer. For the past few years Leveran had patiently and ceaselessly studied blood samples from infected soldiers and had found some constant variables, mainly small spore like objects that he saw which floated in the blood, however these “spores” showed no sign of life or movement and Leveran could deduce nothing other than the fact that they must be related to the disease in some way. On November 6, 1880 he saw in the blood sample of a patient what he described as “fill-form elements that move with great vivacity”. By chance Leveran had discovered the malaria parasite in an evolutionary stage which usually only occurs within the anopheles mosquito, from these observations he immediately ¬†decided that he had found the parasite that causes malaria and sent a form to the academy of medicine stating that he had found a “protozoan parasite” that is the cause of malaria.

Leveran’s discovery is invaluable to medical community as his patience and determination found what might not have been found until many years later when newer technology would make it more easily possible. Leveran’s contribution allowed for the Medical community to discover the disease far earlier and also begin to develop treatments and cures far earlier, thus saving thousands of lives.

References: 

http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/history/laveran.html

11
Dec
11

Africa Fighting Malaria (NGO)

AFM is non-governmental organization headquartered in both Washington D.C and South Africa. It’s mission as stated y the them is to “educate people about the scourge of malaria¬†and the political economy of malaria control”. The NGO basically operates by promoting economic freedom and market based solutions to solve the malaria problem. By promoting economic freedom through ways such as creating jobs and educating people, they can make an impact on the future by making medical care more affordable and by creating awareness about Malaria.

AFM is also devoted to making the federal governments of these countries more aware of the Virus and makes them more accountable for the health of their citizens. AFM brings awareness to all Malaria inflicted areas about their own role in preventing Malaria and the governments role as well.

One of the main ways that AFM looks to fight the Malaria problem is by introducing and promoting the pesticide DDT. As is stated by the AFM, DDT is a very important and useful tool in fighting malaria when used in controlled amounts and environments. This is the most controversial point made by the organization as DDT is a potentially environmentally threatening pesticide that could irreversibly harm a species. Many environmentalists say that AFM is just looking for a way to turn attention away from the matter of environmental sustainability as the AFm is affiliated with at least two resource mining companies.

AFM is funded through many sources but makes a clear statement of not accepting any funding from the government, insecticide industry or the pharmaceutical industry. Much of the money that flows into AFM is also made through donations from around the globe. They also receive funding from  NUMBER health-care and mining corporations.

http://fightingmalaria.org/¬† ——————–> heres a link to the AFM website

References: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Africa_Fighting_Malaria

http://fightingmalaria.org/